black education

The U.S. Department of Education has released preliminary data on degree attainments during the 2008-09 academic year. That year more than 467,000 African Americans were awarded higher education degrees.

African American students are suspended far more frequently than white children, especially in middle school, according to a new study by a UCLA researcher and a colleague in Indiana.

The Department of Education has proposed new rules for students attending career-oriented schools that could disproportionally harm minority students. The rules, which would go into effect in November, could cut off support for those students who need the most financial assistance in getting their education. The new rules would make ineligible for-profit schools that do […]

President Barack Obama celebrated the accomplishments of America’s historically black colleges and universities on Monday, telling a group of leading African-American educators that while major progress has been made in expanding access to higher education, it’s time to “take stock of the work we have left to do.”

In this exclusive interview, NewsOne contributing editor Bakari Kitwana spoke with Zenovia N. Evans, JD, who started a hunger strike on August 5th to protest law school transparency. Speaking about developments with the movement to hold law schools accountable to graduates with rising debt and declining job opportunities, she confirms that she ended the strike […]

With federal financial belts tightening, state budgets bursting, and local governments left with less and less, it’s no surprise that education and children are last in line. As a staunch advocate for children, the daughter of a 45-year-careered teacher and a mom who wants her children to have everything, I am ever vigilant and a […]

Columbia Business School grad wants a judge to unmask the cowardly creep who anonymously labled her a “whore” on YouTube.

Are young black men ready for the increasingly brutal, knowledge-based job market in the U.S.? The answer is a resounding “no,” according to a new report, Yes We Can: The Schott 50 State Report on Public Education and Black Males 2010. Calling it a “national crisis,” the report found that only 47 percent of black […]

I am a 2010 graduate of Nansemond-Suffolk Academy, and attended this school from the age of 3. I am African-American, a race that made up 2-3 percent of the student population.

The Young Women’s Leadership School of East Harlem New York has rounded a decade with 100% of the students being accepted to college. The flagship East Harlem school was opened in 1996 and follows an all-girls public education model.